Remembering the First Intifada: "I Was Detained by Mitzna"

Last month Palestinians marked 30 years since the First Intifada, which erupted on December 9, 1987. In this except from “The First Intifada: Hope and the Loss of Hope,” which appeared in the Autumn, 2017 issue of the Journal of Palestine Studies, Khalid Farraj recounts his own arrest by Israeli soldiers in March 1988 during a security sweep of Jalazun refugee camp, north of Ramallah. The sweep was led by Gen. Amram Mitzna, Israeli officer in charge of the Central Command (West Bank) at the time. Farraj grew up and worked in the camp as an activist leafleting and disseminating information among the community.

Special Focus: Jerusalem

Trump’s recognition of Jerusalem as Israeli capital this past Wednesday has caused a fury of opposition around the world. As protests of his decision continue, this month’s Special Focus offers eight Journal of Palestine Studies articles that, together, shed light on the status of Jerusalem and on the likely consequences of Trump’s decision.

Journal of Palestine Studies, Autumn 2017

With this special issue, the Journal of Palestine Studies addresses the signal moments discussed in an essay by JPS Editor Rashid Khalidi, “Historical Landmarks in the Hundred Years’ War on Palestine,” as well as several other aspects of the struggle over Palestine during the century since 1917.

Remembering Sabra & Shatila

Thirty-three years ago on 16 September 1982, the Lebanese Christian Phalange militia entered the Palestinian refugee camps of Sabra and Shatila in Beirut. Israeli forces occupied the surrounding city and allowed the militia’s entry into the camp. Over the following three days, at least 800 civilians were massacred as Israeli-manned checkpoints turned back fleeing Palestinians and Israeli troops fired flares to illuminate the camp at night.

Symbols Versus Substance: Edward Said on Oslo's Declaration of Principles

On September 13, 1993, Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin and Palestine Liberation Organization Chairman Yasser Arafat signed the Oslo Accords’ Declaration of Principles. To mark that anniversary, we recommend an interview conducted by Senior Fellow Mouin Rabbani with Edward Said on the DOP's consequences for Palestinians: 

The Gaza Strip as Laboratory

On 12 September 2005, Israel completed its withdrawal from the Gaza Strip. While erroneously presented as a peace offering to Palestinians, the unilateral withdrawal rebuffed any cooperation from the Palestinian Authority, enabled an indirect Israeli occupation with Gaza's population treated as dispensable, and served the purpose of entrenching Israeli occupation in the West Bank.

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