Remembering the First Intifada: "I Was Detained by Mitzna"

Last month Palestinians marked 30 years since the First Intifada, which erupted on December 9, 1987. In this except from “The First Intifada: Hope and the Loss of Hope,” which appeared in the Autumn, 2017 issue of the Journal of Palestine Studies, Khalid Farraj recounts his own arrest by Israeli soldiers in March 1988 during a security sweep of Jalazun refugee camp, north of Ramallah. The sweep was led by Gen. Amram Mitzna, Israeli officer in charge of the Central Command (West Bank) at the time. Farraj grew up and worked in the camp as an activist leafleting and disseminating information among the community.

Special Focus: Jerusalem

Trump’s recognition of Jerusalem as Israeli capital this past Wednesday has caused a fury of opposition around the world. As protests of his decision continue, this month’s Special Focus offers eight Journal of Palestine Studies articles that, together, shed light on the status of Jerusalem and on the likely consequences of Trump’s decision.

Journal of Palestine Studies, Autumn 2017

With this special issue, the Journal of Palestine Studies addresses the signal moments discussed in an essay by JPS Editor Rashid Khalidi, “Historical Landmarks in the Hundred Years’ War on Palestine,” as well as several other aspects of the struggle over Palestine during the century since 1917.

Journal of Palestine Studies Vol. 44 No. 4

The latest Journal of Palestine Studies (# 176) features as its free article, "The Two-State Model and Israeli Constitutionalism: Impact on the Palestinian Citizens of Israel" by Mazen Masri, a lecturer in law at the City Law School, City University London. Masri argues that the two-state solution would undermine the legal standing of Palestinian citizens of Israel (PCI) as it would reinforce the definition of Israel as a Jewish state.   

Senior Fellow Mouin Rabbani: Palestinians ‘more isolated than at any point since 1948’

Under cover of the Oslo agreements, Israel has during the past two decades consolidated and intensified its control of the occupied Palestinian territories to an unprecedented degree. Simultaneously, the Palestinian people are today more isolated and fragmented than at any point since their initial dispossession and dispersal in 1948.

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