Journal of Palestine Studies, Spring 2018

The latest issue of the Journal of Palestine Studies is now available, with a special cluster of articles examining what Queer theory and activism can tell us about Palestine: As a method of inquiry, queer theory enriches critical understandings of power and sexuality by questioning hegemonic discourses of salvation, solution, or settlement.

 

Inside Palestine Studies, Spring 2018: 'These Are Extraordinary Times'

In our latest newsletter, Inside Palestine Studies, we focus on Jerusalem and the details reported about the Trump "peace plan." As Rashid Khalidi notes, amid these extraordinary times, "the ability of the Palestinians to resist will again be sorely tested in the absence of decisive and unified leadership, at a time when the broader Arab world is riven by division, weakened by the absence of democracy, and undermined by the increasingly favorable disposition to Israel of many of its absolute rulers."

Occupation Becomes Permanent

Last month Palestinians marked the 70th anniversary of the Nakba by exploring the historical foundations of the events that transpired in 1948 when nearly 750,000 Palestinians were driven from their homes and never allowed to return. Far from a singular historical event that ended with the establishment of the State of Israel, the Nakba is part of a deliberate process of dispossession and displacement that continues today as Palestinians mark 51 years of occupation since the 1967 War, known as the Naksa.

IPS Scholars Rashid Khalidi and Salim Tamari Awarded Prestigious Accolades

The Institute for Palestine Studies (IPS) is honored to announce that two of its longtime scholars, Rashid Khalidi and Salim Tamari, have recently received awards from the World Congress for Middle Eastern Studies (WOCMES) and the State of Palestine, respectively.

"Making the Desert Bloom": A Myth Examined

Late Israeli President Shimon Peres was quoted back in 1970 as saying, "The country [Palestine] was mostly an empty desert, with only a few islands of Arab settlement; and Israel's cultivable land today was indeed redeemed from swamp and wilderness." This central theme of early Zionist colonization of Palestine was refuted in this 1979 Journal of Palestine Studies article by Alan George.

Four Hours in Shatila

From September 16 to September 18, 1982 between 1,000-3,500 Palestinians were massacred by Phalangist militias supported by Israeli troops. "What can we say to their families who left with Arafat, trusting in the promises of Reagan, Mitterrand and Perini, who had assured them that the civilian population of the camps would be safe? How can we explain that we allowed children, old people and women to be massacred, and that we are abandoning their bodies without prayers? How can we tell them that we don't know where they are buried?"

Zionist Settler Colonialism

To commemorate the United Nation’s “International Day of the World’s Indigenous People,” on August 9th, the Institute for Palestine Studies is making available seven articles from the Journal of Palestine Studies archives that highlight the history of Zionist settler colonialism upon the indigenous people of Palestine and the current methods used which continue this process into the present day.

From the Small Zinzana to the Bigger Zinzana: Israeli Prisons, Palestinian Prisons

The Palestinian experience has been aptly characterized as carceralism, in both literal and metaphorical senses. It is arguable that ever since the 1967 occupation of the West Bank and Gaza, the most consensual pillar of national Palestinian discourse has been the issue of Palestinians imprisoned by Israel. After Hamas’s so-called takeover of Gaza in 2007, however, a new, intra- Palestinian carceralism emerged.

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