Remembering the First Intifada: "I Was Detained by Mitzna"

Last month Palestinians marked 30 years since the First Intifada, which erupted on December 9, 1987. In this except from “The First Intifada: Hope and the Loss of Hope,” which appeared in the Autumn, 2017 issue of the Journal of Palestine Studies, Khalid Farraj recounts his own arrest by Israeli soldiers in March 1988 during a security sweep of Jalazun refugee camp, north of Ramallah. The sweep was led by Gen. Amram Mitzna, Israeli officer in charge of the Central Command (West Bank) at the time. Farraj grew up and worked in the camp as an activist leafleting and disseminating information among the community.

Special Focus: Jerusalem

Trump’s recognition of Jerusalem as Israeli capital this past Wednesday has caused a fury of opposition around the world. As protests of his decision continue, this month’s Special Focus offers eight Journal of Palestine Studies articles that, together, shed light on the status of Jerusalem and on the likely consequences of Trump’s decision.

Journal of Palestine Studies, Autumn 2017

With this special issue, the Journal of Palestine Studies addresses the signal moments discussed in an essay by JPS Editor Rashid Khalidi, “Historical Landmarks in the Hundred Years’ War on Palestine,” as well as several other aspects of the struggle over Palestine during the century since 1917.

Zionist Settler Colonialism

To commemorate the United Nation’s “International Day of the World’s Indigenous People,” on August 9th, the Institute for Palestine Studies is making available seven articles from the Journal of Palestine Studies archives that highlight the history of Zionist settler colonialism upon the indigenous people of Palestine and the current methods used which continue this process into the present day.

From the Small Zinzana to the Bigger Zinzana: Israeli Prisons, Palestinian Prisons

The Palestinian experience has been aptly characterized as carceralism, in both literal and metaphorical senses. It is arguable that ever since the 1967 occupation of the West Bank and Gaza, the most consensual pillar of national Palestinian discourse has been the issue of Palestinians imprisoned by Israel. After Hamas’s so-called takeover of Gaza in 2007, however, a new, intra- Palestinian carceralism emerged.

Newest Issue of the Journal of Palestine Studies, 179 Vol. 45, No. 3 (Spring 2016)

PALESTINE IN RECENT MONTHS has witnessed a new kind of continuous, low-level ferment that betokens many Palestinians’ profound disquiet with the status quo: Israel’s ever more entrenched military occupation and the ceaseless expansion of its colonization project. Predictions that this ferment would erupt into something bigger and more general, akin to the two intifadas of the past three decades, have proven misplaced.

Call for Submissions: Jerusalem Quarterly Special Issue on Residual Spaces and Historical Context

Jerusalem Quarterly (JQ) is preparing a special issue on residual spaces and their historical context. The idea behind the contributions is to create a dossier that examines a number of architectural remnants and derelict spaces in the greater Jerusalem area, which have been transformed by successive regimes, wars, reuse, negligence and/or abandonment.

Special Focus – Remembrances

Unlike others who have also known and been transformed by tragedy, the Palestinian people remain consigned to their tragic fate. Notwithstanding their struggles, Palestinians continue to stand out for their remarkable professional achievements and as examples of steadfast resistance. Honoring their legacy serves to preserve collective Palestinian memory and history. 

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This Day in Palestine: Israel's Elections and Their Implications

On May 29, 1996, Likud opposition leader Benjamin Netanyahu, opponent of the Oslo accords, was elected Israeli Prime Minister. Netanyahu's first electoral victory held portents for his subsequent return to the office in 2009. As Benny Morris wrote at the time, the “peace process would grind to a halt” and “ultranationalism [and] . . . fundamentalist religious currents that have taken hold of the minds and souls of growing numbers of Israelis since the 1967 war” would be further galvanized.

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