Journal of Palestine Studies, Autumn 2017

With this special issue, the Journal of Palestine Studies addresses the signal moments discussed in an essay by JPS Editor Rashid Khalidi, “Historical Landmarks in the Hundred Years’ War on Palestine,” as well as several other aspects of the struggle over Palestine during the century since 1917.

IPS NEW BOOK PRE-SALE

In the Land of My Birth recounts the coming of age of a blind Palestinian boy of modest milieu during the turbulent years leading up to the fall of Palestine in 1948. Above all, it is the boy’s life—his struggles to make his way in the sighted world, his upbringing, schooling, friendships, and adventures. 

Journal of Palestine Studies, Summer 2017

The Journal is proud to present a feature by Sahar Francis on Palestinian women prisoners in Israeli jails. Her report is based on extensive interviews with former prisoners, and on her work at the head of an organization dedicated to the defense of prisoners’ rights. In tandem, managing editor Nehad Khader writes on former prisoner and outspoken human-rights activist Rasmea Odeh. Odeh’s conviction in Israel decades ago on terrorism charges was secured by a confession obtained after she was tortured and raped, and her recently ordered deportation from the United States (where she resides) was decreed by a federal court that did not allow these facts to be considered.

"Making the Desert Bloom": A Myth Examined

Late Israeli President Shimon Peres was quoted back in 1970 as saying, "The country [Palestine] was mostly an empty desert, with only a few islands of Arab settlement; and Israel's cultivable land today was indeed redeemed from swamp and wilderness." This central theme of early Zionist colonization of Palestine was refuted in this 1979 Journal of Palestine Studies article by Alan George.

Four Hours in Shatila

From September 16 to September 18, 1982 between 1,000-3,500 Palestinians were massacred by Phalangist militias supported by Israeli troops. "What can we say to their families who left with Arafat, trusting in the promises of Reagan, Mitterrand and Perini, who had assured them that the civilian population of the camps would be safe? How can we explain that we allowed children, old people and women to be massacred, and that we are abandoning their bodies without prayers? How can we tell them that we don't know where they are buried?"

Zionist Settler Colonialism

To commemorate the United Nation’s “International Day of the World’s Indigenous People,” on August 9th, the Institute for Palestine Studies is making available seven articles from the Journal of Palestine Studies archives that highlight the history of Zionist settler colonialism upon the indigenous people of Palestine and the current methods used which continue this process into the present day.

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