Remembering the First Intifada: "I Was Detained by Mitzna"

Last month Palestinians marked 30 years since the First Intifada, which erupted on December 9, 1987. In this except from “The First Intifada: Hope and the Loss of Hope,” which appeared in the Autumn, 2017 issue of the Journal of Palestine Studies, Khalid Farraj recounts his own arrest by Israeli soldiers in March 1988 during a security sweep of Jalazun refugee camp, north of Ramallah. The sweep was led by Gen. Amram Mitzna, Israeli officer in charge of the Central Command (West Bank) at the time. Farraj grew up and worked in the camp as an activist leafleting and disseminating information among the community.

Special Focus: Jerusalem

Trump’s recognition of Jerusalem as Israeli capital this past Wednesday has caused a fury of opposition around the world. As protests of his decision continue, this month’s Special Focus offers eight Journal of Palestine Studies articles that, together, shed light on the status of Jerusalem and on the likely consequences of Trump’s decision.

Journal of Palestine Studies, Autumn 2017

With this special issue, the Journal of Palestine Studies addresses the signal moments discussed in an essay by JPS Editor Rashid Khalidi, “Historical Landmarks in the Hundred Years’ War on Palestine,” as well as several other aspects of the struggle over Palestine during the century since 1917.

"Making the Desert Bloom": A Myth Examined

Late Israeli President Shimon Peres was quoted back in 1970 as saying, "The country [Palestine] was mostly an empty desert, with only a few islands of Arab settlement; and Israel's cultivable land today was indeed redeemed from swamp and wilderness." This central theme of early Zionist colonization of Palestine was refuted in this 1979 Journal of Palestine Studies article by Alan George.

Four Hours in Shatila

From September 16 to September 18, 1982 between 1,000-3,500 Palestinians were massacred by Phalangist militias supported by Israeli troops. "What can we say to their families who left with Arafat, trusting in the promises of Reagan, Mitterrand and Perini, who had assured them that the civilian population of the camps would be safe? How can we explain that we allowed children, old people and women to be massacred, and that we are abandoning their bodies without prayers? How can we tell them that we don't know where they are buried?"

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