Special Focus: Hamas at Crossroads

While speculation about the fate of the movement and its role in Palestinian politics has reached unprecedented levels, it remains unclear how exactly will Hamas address the brewing crises at its doorstep. Whether the goal is to retain its political power or a return to its insulated resistance mode, the nature of the road ahead depends on how Hamas defines itself in light of largely different geopolitical realities from those that defined its inception in the late 1980s.

Seminar: Palestinian Challenges to the Modern Sovereignty Concept as Forged by Hobbes and Rousseau

Dr. Khaled Furani presents a Palestinian challenge to the concept of sovereignty as formulated by the founding celebrants Hobbes and Rousseau. Within a dissolving Middle East, it is imperative to critique the concept of sovereignty which dominates the modern political imagination. The proposed critique draws on resources from the Palestinian experience and from the past and present of the Arab-Muslim tradition. It endeavors to generate possibilities for restoring humility to governances and inducing a more genuine flourishing of persons, polities, and the planet.

Fall 2017 Editorial Internship

The Journal of Palestine Studies, the oldest English-language academic journal devoted exclusively to Palestinian affairs and the Arab-Israeli conflict, is a mix of peer-reviewed scholarly articles, reports, essays, and interviews, and includes documentary and other current materials useful to researchers. Published quarterly by the University of California Press at Berkeley, JPS is edited at the Washington, D.C. affiliate of the Beirut-based Institute for Palestine Studies, which also maintains an office in Ramallah. Rashid Khalidi, the Edward Said Professor of Modern Arab Studies at Columbia University, is the journal’s editor.

"Making the Desert Bloom": A Myth Examined

Late Israeli President Shimon Peres was quoted back in 1970 as saying, "The country [Palestine] was mostly an empty desert, with only a few islands of Arab settlement; and Israel's cultivable land today was indeed redeemed from swamp and wilderness." This central theme of early Zionist colonization of Palestine was refuted in this 1979 Journal of Palestine Studies article by Alan George.

Four Hours in Shatila

From September 16 to September 18, 1982 between 1,000-3,500 Palestinians were massacred by Phalangist militias supported by Israeli troops. "What can we say to their families who left with Arafat, trusting in the promises of Reagan, Mitterrand and Perini, who had assured them that the civilian population of the camps would be safe? How can we explain that we allowed children, old people and women to be massacred, and that we are abandoning their bodies without prayers? How can we tell them that we don't know where they are buried?"

Zionist Settler Colonialism

To commemorate the United Nation’s “International Day of the World’s Indigenous People,” on August 9th, the Institute for Palestine Studies is making available seven articles from the Journal of Palestine Studies archives that highlight the history of Zionist settler colonialism upon the indigenous people of Palestine and the current methods used which continue this process into the present day.

From the Small Zinzana to the Bigger Zinzana: Israeli Prisons, Palestinian Prisons

The Palestinian experience has been aptly characterized as carceralism, in both literal and metaphorical senses. It is arguable that ever since the 1967 occupation of the West Bank and Gaza, the most consensual pillar of national Palestinian discourse has been the issue of Palestinians imprisoned by Israel. After Hamas’s so-called takeover of Gaza in 2007, however, a new, intra- Palestinian carceralism emerged.

Newest Issue of the Journal of Palestine Studies, 179 Vol. 45, No. 3 (Spring 2016)

PALESTINE IN RECENT MONTHS has witnessed a new kind of continuous, low-level ferment that betokens many Palestinians’ profound disquiet with the status quo: Israel’s ever more entrenched military occupation and the ceaseless expansion of its colonization project. Predictions that this ferment would erupt into something bigger and more general, akin to the two intifadas of the past three decades, have proven misplaced.

Call for Submissions: Jerusalem Quarterly Special Issue on Residual Spaces and Historical Context

Jerusalem Quarterly (JQ) is preparing a special issue on residual spaces and their historical context. The idea behind the contributions is to create a dossier that examines a number of architectural remnants and derelict spaces in the greater Jerusalem area, which have been transformed by successive regimes, wars, reuse, negligence and/or abandonment.

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