Journal of Palestine Studies, Autumn 2017

With this special issue, the Journal of Palestine Studies addresses the signal moments discussed in an essay by JPS Editor Rashid Khalidi, “Historical Landmarks in the Hundred Years’ War on Palestine,” as well as several other aspects of the struggle over Palestine during the century since 1917.

IPS NEW BOOK PRE-SALE

In the Land of My Birth recounts the coming of age of a blind Palestinian boy of modest milieu during the turbulent years leading up to the fall of Palestine in 1948. Above all, it is the boy’s life—his struggles to make his way in the sighted world, his upbringing, schooling, friendships, and adventures. 

Journal of Palestine Studies, Summer 2017

The Journal is proud to present a feature by Sahar Francis on Palestinian women prisoners in Israeli jails. Her report is based on extensive interviews with former prisoners, and on her work at the head of an organization dedicated to the defense of prisoners’ rights. In tandem, managing editor Nehad Khader writes on former prisoner and outspoken human-rights activist Rasmea Odeh. Odeh’s conviction in Israel decades ago on terrorism charges was secured by a confession obtained after she was tortured and raped, and her recently ordered deportation from the United States (where she resides) was decreed by a federal court that did not allow these facts to be considered.

97 Years Ago: Balfour & British Imperialism in Palestine

November 2nd marked the 97th anniversary of the 1917 Balfour Declaration declaring “His Majesty's Government view with favour the establishment in Palestine of a national home for the Jewish people” in a letter from U.K. Foreign Secretary Arthur James Balfour to British Zionist partisan Lionel Walter Rothschild. This November's Special Focus covers Balfour, British imperial policy in Palestine and its effects on the Palestinian people.

PALESTINE DECEPTION Pre-Sale Pricing Ends 10/15

J. M. N. Jeffries, formerly a war correspondent in Europe and the Middle East, working for Britain’s largest-selling newspaper, the Daily Mail, was sent to Palestine in 1922 by its owner, Lord Northcliffe, to report on its developing political and economic affairs—just five years on from the Balfour Declaration and its promise of British support for the establishment in Palestine of a Jewish national home.

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