Fall 2017 Editorial Internship

The Journal of Palestine Studies, the oldest English-language academic journal devoted exclusively to Palestinian affairs and the Arab-Israeli conflict, is a mix of peer-reviewed scholarly articles, reports, essays, and interviews, and includes documentary and other current materials useful to researchers. Published quarterly by the University of California Press at Berkeley, JPS is edited at the Washington, D.C. affiliate of the Beirut-based Institute for Palestine Studies, which also maintains an office in Ramallah. Rashid Khalidi, the Edward Said Professor of Modern Arab Studies at Columbia University, is the journal’s editor.

Remembering Mahmoud Darwish

Exile, longing, identity, and humanity are the themes that are discussed at length in eight Journal of Palestine Studies articles* as part of this month’s Special Focus, including three translations of commentary by Darwish himself, as well as his statement on the 11 September tragedy. In one of them, dated May 24, 1974, Darwish recounts an experience at Brussels airport that is eerily familiar to the situation many Palestinians and their supporters face today at Tel Aviv airport when they seek to visit the holy land.

Spring 2017 Newsletter: Inside Palestine Studies

Fall 2017 Editorial Internship

The Journal of Palestine Studies, the oldest English-language academic journal devoted exclusively to Palestinian affairs and the Arab-Israeli conflict, is a mix of peer-reviewed scholarly articles, reports, essays, and interviews, and includes documentary and other current materials useful to researchers. Published quarterly by the University of California Press at Berkeley, JPS is edited at the Washington, D.C. affiliate of the Beirut-based Institute for Palestine Studies, which also maintains an office in Ramallah. Rashid Khalidi, the Edward Said Professor of Modern Arab Studies at Columbia University, is the journal’s editor.

The 1987 Intifada

The conference aims to raise the following questions, among other: How do we conceive of the Intifada after thirty years? How did the Palestinian collective memory maintain that event? What were the cause of the Intifada and why it gained a wide popular base? What impact did it leave on society, culture, politics, and on the image of the Palestinians worldwide? Does the Intifada have an exceptional historical peculiarity? Can a similar uprising happen again?

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