From the Small Zinzana to the Bigger Zinzana: Israeli Prisons, Palestinian Prisons

The Palestinian experience has been aptly characterized as carceralism, in both literal and metaphorical senses. It is arguable that ever since the 1967 occupation of the West Bank and Gaza, the most consensual pillar of national Palestinian discourse has been the issue of Palestinians imprisoned by Israel. After Hamas’s so-called takeover of Gaza in 2007, however, a new, intra- Palestinian carceralism emerged. This article traces the shifts in Palestinian representations and experiences of the carceral post-2007, their historical resonances in the late Oslo era, and their implications for Palestinian unity after nine years of division.

Newest Issue of the Journal of Palestine Studies, 179 Vol. 45, No. 3 (Spring 2016)

PALESTINE IN RECENT MONTHS has witnessed a new kind of continuous, low-level ferment that betokens many Palestinians’ profound disquiet with the status quo: Israel’s ever more entrenched military occupation and the ceaseless expansion of its colonization project. Predictions that this ferment would erupt into something bigger and more general, akin to the two intifadas of the past three decades, have proven misplaced. This may have been due to the efficiency of Israeli repression, combined with the collaborative efforts of the security agencies of the Palestinian Authority (PA) whose cooperation senior Israeli security officials have lauded. It may also have been a function of the diffuse nature of the movement, which observers across the political spectrum agree has been spontaneous rather than centrally organized. As usual, the casualties have been heavily lopsided. While over thirty Israelis have been killed, the Palestinian death toll is over two hundred, with many of the latter shot down by Israeli army snipers during protests and demonstrations.

Yarmuk Refugee Camp and the Syrian Uprising: A View from Within

In recognition of World Refugee Day, we present Nidal Bitari's personal account of life in Syria's largest Palestinian refugee camp, Yarmuk, which has been the site of devastating regime attacks and infiltration by anti-regime militants: 

When the Syrian uprising began in early spring 2011, the great majority of Palestinians in the country were determined to remain neutral. This was the case both for the factions, including those tied to the regime, and for ordinary people. Everyone knew about the September 1982 Sabra and Shatila massacres in Beirut and about the mass expulsions of stateless Palestinians from Kuwait during the first Gulf War, not to mention what happened to them after the U.S. invasion of Iraq. No one wanted anything like that here. 

From the Small Zinzana to the Bigger Zinzana: Israeli Prisons, Palestinian Prisons

The Palestinian experience has been aptly characterized as carceralism, in both literal and metaphorical senses. It is arguable that ever since the 1967 occupation of the West Bank and Gaza, the most consensual pillar of national Palestinian discourse has been the issue of Palestinians imprisoned by Israel. After Hamas’s so-called takeover of Gaza in 2007, however, a new, intra- Palestinian carceralism emerged.

Newest Issue of the Journal of Palestine Studies, 179 Vol. 45, No. 3 (Spring 2016)

PALESTINE IN RECENT MONTHS has witnessed a new kind of continuous, low-level ferment that betokens many Palestinians’ profound disquiet with the status quo: Israel’s ever more entrenched military occupation and the ceaseless expansion of its colonization project. Predictions that this ferment would erupt into something bigger and more general, akin to the two intifadas of the past three decades, have proven misplaced.

Call for Submissions: Jerusalem Quarterly Special Issue on Residual Spaces and Historical Context

Jerusalem Quarterly (JQ) is preparing a special issue on residual spaces and their historical context. The idea behind the contributions is to create a dossier that examines a number of architectural remnants and derelict spaces in the greater Jerusalem area, which have been transformed by successive regimes, wars, reuse, negligence and/or abandonment.

Special Focus – Remembrances

Unlike others who have also known and been transformed by tragedy, the Palestinian people remain consigned to their tragic fate. Notwithstanding their struggles, Palestinians continue to stand out for their remarkable professional achievements and as examples of steadfast resistance. Honoring their legacy serves to preserve collective Palestinian memory and history. 

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This Day in Palestine: Israel's Elections and Their Implications

On May 29, 1996, Likud opposition leader Benjamin Netanyahu, opponent of the Oslo accords, was elected Israeli Prime Minister. Netanyahu's first electoral victory held portents for his subsequent return to the office in 2009. As Benny Morris wrote at the time, the “peace process would grind to a halt” and “ultranationalism [and] . . . fundamentalist religious currents that have taken hold of the minds and souls of growing numbers of Israelis since the 1967 war” would be further galvanized.

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